Resources

01 Dec 2010

This toolkit presents conceptual and practical information on engaging men and boys in promoting gender equality and health. Specific topics it addresses include sexual and reproductive health, material, newborn and child health, fatherhood, HIV and AIDS prevention, care and support, and GBV prevention. In addition to laying out numerous examples of programmes that have effectively addressed these issues, the toolkit provides guidance on advocacy, needs assessment, monitoring and evaluation related to efforts to engage men and boys.

29 Nov 2010

Created in God’s Image: From Hegemony to Partnership is a Church Manual on Men as Partners: Promoting Positive Masculinities. It builds on the gender manual, Created in God’s Image: From Hierarchy to Partnership, which was developed and published by the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) in 2003. It embodies and builds on the rich experiences gained from workshops, which were done from 2006 to 2010 in St Maarten, Malawi, Guyana and Kenya.

25 Oct 2010

'Men are Changing' seeks to strengthen and broaden the evidence base on working with men and boys. It describes and analyzes 12 programmes from around the world that sought to alter the attitudes and behaviours of men in relation to sexuality, sexual and reproductive health, violence and relationships.

The report discusses challenges in this field, provides an overview of emerging good practice, and makes recommendations for improving existing policy work, programmes and services.

25 Oct 2010

Work with men has demonstrated significant potential in contributing to building gender equality and improving the health of women and men. However, most work with men has tended to be local in scale and limited in scope. To be more widely effective, that is to transform the pervasive gender inequalities which characterize many societies globally – efforts to transform men’s behaviour require to be significantly scaled up. Policy processes and mechanisms are key elements in any effort to engage men and boys in achieving gender equality.
This Policy Brief:

20 Jul 2010

There is a persistent debate, in both community and academic circles, regarding domestic violence and gender, and in particular, whether women's domestic violence against men is as common or as serious as men's domestic violence against women. The following articles are useful contributions to this debate. While they acknowledge women's domestic violence, they show that the claim of gender symmetry in domestic violence is not supported by the evidence.

The evidence is that:

05 May 2010

NOMAS, the National Organization of Men Against Sexism, is celebrating its 35th year with our National Conference on Men & Masculinity (M&M), and the 22nd Annual Men's Studies Association Meeting in partnership with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) 14th National Conference on Domestic Violence: Changing Faces of the Movement, in Anaheim, CA, July 31-August 4, 2010.

To read more, go to http://www.nomas.org/node/35

20 Apr 2010

This Information Paper focuses on men’s roles in progress towards gender equality. It answers two questions:
1) To what extent are men supportive of gender equality?
2) What can be done to engage men in progress towards gender equality?

03 Apr 2010

Catalyst believes that men have a critical role to play in diversity and inclusion efforts, especially initiatives to eliminate gender bias. In Engaging Men in Gender Initiatives: What Change Agents Need to Know, the first report in Catalyst's Engaging Men in Gender Initiatives series, Catalyst provided pivotal information about the cultural forces that can undermine organizational efforts to fully engage men as champions of gender initiatives. In this second report, Catalyst examines factors that can heighten or dampen men’s interest in acquiring skills to become effective change agents for gender equality at work.

02 Apr 2010

Engaging men and boys has emerged as a vital strategy for ending gender based violence, including in refugee and post-conflict settings. While prevention and response activities are essential, the humanitarian community and host country service providers understand that they must move beyond simply addressing each individual case of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and begin to address the societal, cultural, economic, religious and political systems that either perpetuate or allow for violence based on gender to continue.

30 Mar 2010

Could changes in men’s attitudes and behaviors about health, violence and parenting benefit women, children – and men? Do national policies influence men’s behaviors in relation to child rearing, employment and gender-based violence?