men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

Violence

Working with men: Strategies and challenges in engaging men in building non-violence and gender equality

Efforts to engage men in preventing men’s violence against women are gaining momentum around the world. Men are becoming involved as participants in education programs, audiences for social marketing, activists and advocates, community leaders, and policy makers. First then, what do we know about effective practice in engaging men in violence prevention? What works, and what doesn’t? Second, what are the challenges and controversies of this work?

Engaging men on campus in violence prevention

The Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) "2014 Current Practices and Challenges: Engaging Men on Campus" provides insight into how 2014 OVW Campus Program grantees fostered men as allies in the prevention of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The assessment also provides effective theories and comprehensive steps to engage men in prevention.

If you are interested in reading the assessment, you can download it at:
http://changingourcampus.org/application/files/6714/5927/8564/2014-Men-C...

The harms of pornography exposure among children and young people

What are the impacts of pornography exposure or consumption among children and young people? And what can be done about it? These questions are the focus of an Australian Government enquiry, "Harm being done to Australian children through access to pornography on the Internet". In the submission here, Dr Michael Flood summarises the research evidence and outlines key strategies for preventing and limiting harm.

EMERGE (Engendering Men: Evidence on Routes to Gender Equality): Policy brief, practice brief, plus evidence review, tools and guides

The EMERGE (Engendering Men: Evidence on Routes to Gender Equality) project has produced a new policy briefing which makes the case for re-framing policy on gender equality in order to more productively factor in men and boys, and suggests actions and approaches that policy makers can take to do this. The briefing, along with an accompanying practice brief and a conceptual framing paper, is available here.
 

Start With Respect - A new resource for young men

White Ribbon New Zealand has recently developed Start With Respect, a new resource for young men that gives tips on how to start a respectful relationship with women.

It is available from http://whiteribbon.org.nz/2016/02/14/start-with-respect/

This is a free, public resource and can be used in many different settings - please distribute it out and use it to prevent sexual violence and promote positive male behaviour.

Special journal issue on 'Working with Men and Boys' - Now available free

That we need to work with men and boys has become a key mantra of health programmes globally, particularly those concerned with HIV, violence and more recently sexual and reproductive health and rights, and yet there is very little known about how effective these programmes are, nor of the challenges, opportunities and politics of this work. A special issue of Culture, Health and Sexuality draws together a number of globally recognised authors to reflect on the field, as well as provide provocative insights into the politics and processes of working with men and boys.

Challenging Patriarchy: Unsettling Men and Masculinities (IDS Virtual Bulletin)

Challenging Patriarchy presents contributions to the evolution of thinking on men and masculinities in Gender and Development, drawing on three IDS Bulletins published over a period of more than a decade: Men, Masculinities and Development (2000), edited by Andrea Cornwall and Sarah White, Sexuality Matters (2006), edited by Andrea Cornwall and Susie Jolly, and

Men as Partners Programme: Promising Practices Guide (unpublished, 2005)

This Promising Practices Guide identifies and discusses key lessons that have been learned from the implementation of the Men as Partners (MAP) programme in South Africa.  These lessons on promising practices have been drawn from the work of the MAP programme partners, including Planned Parenthood Association of South Africa (PPASA), Hope Worldwide, the AIDS Consortium and their affiliates, as well as the Solidarity Centre and their trade union partners.