men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

Working with Boys and Men

What about the boys?

Stephen Fisher assesses three approaches to boyswork. Please see below for the attachment, in PDF.

Effective Multi-Cultural Organizing Strategies For Men To End Men’s Violence

Sexual violence is a men’s issue. Men perpetrate the vast majority of sexual assault –
regardless of the gender of the person victimized; men too are victimized, and men are
the significant others (lovers, housemates, sons, classmates, brothers, cousins…) of
women and men who are sexually victimized. In all of these ways, sexual violence is an
issue that men confront. In spite of this, and in spite of the increasing efforts over the
past 20 years to define sexual violence as a men’s issue, men, by and large, continue to
ignore, deny, minimize, and otherwise avoid the issues of sexual violence. Sexual
violence is still conceived of as a “woman’s issue,” and men still make up only a tiny
minority of those present at events addressing sexual assault.

Changing Men: Best practice in sexual violence education

Michael Flood reviews what works and doesn't work in violence prevention education with men, focusing on educational strategies which are face-to-face. See below for the attachment, in PDF.

Men As Partners In Primary Sexual Violence Prevention

Male involvement in sexual violence prevention has increased sharply over the past decade. Organizations such as Men Can Stop Rape, The Oakland Men’s Project, One In Four, and the White Ribbon Campaign have received tremendous interest from both within, and outside of, the established anti-rape movement. The past ten years have also seen some sexual assault crisis centers (SACCs) renewing the social change “roots” of their work by developing or strengthening primary prevention projects - projects intended to prevent the initial perpetration of sexual violence. Many of these SACCs, sometimes in conjunction with campus-based sexual violence programs, have recognized the need for prevention programming that connects with young men. The rationale for this heightened interest in male-focused programming comes from the fact that males commit the vast majority of sexual violence, and are thus in a powerful position to generate change. To this end, these programs often seek participation from male allies in order to gain greater insight into what types of messages and methods might resonate with men in their larger community, offer positive, non-violent alternatives to traditional masculinity, and/or model constructive cross-gender collaboration.

Men, Gender, and Development

Should men be included in programming and policy related to gender, and, if so, how can male inclusion be made most beneficial? Michael Flood provides an overview, in this piece published in the Development Bulletin, No. 64, March 2004. Please see the attachment below in PDF.

Men and Gender Equality: Resistance, Responsibilities and Reaching Out

Jeff Hearn considers the implications for men of developing gender equality and the challenges that this presents.

Mainstreaming Men in Gender Practice and Policy

Practical strategies for engaging men in gender programming and policy.

Responding to men's rights groups

Men's rights groups represent a hostile backlash to feminism, but their efforts in fact are unhelpful and even harmful for men themselves. Michael Flood describes how we can respond.

Tools for White Guys who are Working for Social Change… and other people socialized in a society based on domination

Chris Crass outlines practical strategies for minimising everyday domination.

1. Practice noticing who’s in the room at meetings - how many gender privileged men (biological men), how many women, how many transgendered people, how many white people, how many people of color, is it majority heterosexual, are there out queers, what are people’s class backgrounds. Don’t assume to know people, but also work at being more aware – listening to what people say and talking with people one on one who you work with.

Building a Movement of Men Working to End Violence Against Women (2001)

Michael Kaufman discusses the need to both address and involve men in ending violence against women (VAW), a few of the pitfalls and guiding principles, and shares his thoughts on what is the most developed example of this work, that is, the White Ribbon Campaign.
Please see below for the attachment, in PDF.