men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

Growing up

The quest for modern manhood: masculine stereotypes, peer culture and the social significance of homophobia

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David Plummer examines boys' use of homophobic terms, their role in the dynamics of adolescent male peer groups, and their relationship to adult identity formation.

Please see below for the attachment, in PDF.

Being a mate

You might think being a mate is as easy as drinking beer for your average Aussie bloke but it's not always that simple. Tony Nairn wades into the deep waters of mateship looking for some pointers.

Chris and me

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Stephen Macintosh reflects on sharing his life with his best mate.

Boys, Young Men and Gender Equality

Michael Flood provides an overview, in this presentation to the Commission on the Status of Women in New York in 2005. Please see the attachment below, in PDF.

The Trauma of the Gendered Child

From around 2005 until early 2006, I delusionally entertained an idea of myself as ungendered. Then a radical activist friend, Yolanda Carrington, pointed out to me how politically absurd this notion of mine was. And I realized that the white male supremacist mind—mine in particular—is quite capable of generating lots of mental CRAP. How could I have grown up in a deeply white male supremacist society, and not be socially and interpersonally gendered? Her point was that regardless of what I thought of myself as, I am in a real world where gender—and race—matter, a lot. And being gendered, as a woman or man, a girl or a boy, is not something one can escape. Privileges and power are distributed based on how we are perceived, and according to our anatomy. The anatomy is biological, but the political meaning is entirely social.

Love myself

Patrick Instone reflects on growing up with pornography.

Me? Wanking?

Masturbation: Michael Flood asks the questions.